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Sim and reality.

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    Sim and reality.

    Yesterday, not having flown in many years my nine year old Grandson and I took a Saturday afternoon round trip from KGSP to KATL and back for his first plane ride. Kind of a joint Birthday present since we were both born in September. It was two short flights on Southwest but that was fine since climb and approach are the most interesting parts of most flights. I've been showing the little fella my sim since he was old enough to sit on my lap and he grew up loving planes. I got to show him first hand a little of the reality of airline flying. I am hoping to impress upon him the fact that there are many wonderful goals in life worth striving for if you stay clean, work and study hard and over come discouragement. When we got home yesterday the first thing he wanted me to do was pull up a Southwest 737 on my sim and let him try his hand.
    Personally I was impressed with the accuracy of my PMDG 737-700, and my Imagine Sim KATL. From a passenger seat anyway. Just like I've flown that route in the sim with the OZZIE1 arrival to 08L. One difference is that I think I am a much smoother pilot on the ground then those guys. They seemed to jerk that thing around like a school bus. When we entered RWY04 at KGSP I believe they were already spooled to 40% N1 before they were straight on the runway.
    Our plane N727SW (Nevada One) was sure in bad need of a fresh paint. It was faded out something awful with paint chips around the wind screen and engine intakes. Far cry from the livery we had available in the sim.
    It was a great day for both of us and I just wanted to share. If you read this far without a yawn I appreciate it.
    Victor Green

    #2
    Time is running thin

    I always smirk a bit when they spool up while still lining up and hit toga as soon as the nose points approximately in runway direction 😂, all above those short hopper airplanes like 737 and A320. Then they rocket away with their 12000 lbs of fuel like there was a tarantula behind them.

    on my first trip to the USA in 2003 I flew on a North Worst DC10 and we sat on the runway in Amsterdam for certainly 5 minutes. Then they spooled up the engines so carefully and slowly that it seems they wanted to listen to the sound of every 10% to make sure nothing broke. And after using the full runway the climb rate was sooo slow that after turning left over the sea we could still count the souls on the boats 😆

    a totally different experience to what‘s done today in this terribly efficient world.
    Last edited by Ephedrin; 22Sep2020, 13:36.
    i7-6700k, GTX 1080TI, 32GB DDR4 RAM @2666MHz, 4k
    Marc Ehnle

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      #3
      Originally posted by Ephedrin View Post
      Time is running thin

      I always smirk a bit when they spool up while still lining up and hit toga as soon as the nose points approximately in runway direction 😂, all above those short hopper airplanes like 737 and A320. Then they rocket away with their 12000 lbs of fuel like there was a tarantula behind them.

      on my first trip to the USA in 2003 I flew on a North Worst DC10 and we sat on the runway in Amsterdam for certainly 5 minutes. Then they spooled up the engines so carefully and slowly that it seems they wanted to listen to the sound of every 10% to make sure nothing broke. And after using the full runway the climb rate was sooo slow that after turning left over the sea we could still count the souls on the boats 😆

      a totally different experience to what‘s done today in this terribly efficient world.
      Ephedrin,

      Are you rated in the DC-10? Do you know what the restrictions ATC was imposing on the DC-10? Do you know how close to MGTOW the aircraft was before departing?

      As for your "North Worst" comment, I know/knew a lot of folks that fly/flew for NWA and they were some of the finest "sticks" I know/knew. I've been on the jump seat of NWA DC-10s and they did not fly them any different than AAL or CAL.
      Bode Bridges
      I Earned my Spurs in Vietnam

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Bluestar View Post

        Ephedrin,

        Are you rated in the DC-10? Do you know what the restrictions ATC was imposing on the DC-10? Do you know how close to MGTOW the aircraft was before departing?

        As for your "North Worst" comment, I know/knew a lot of folks that fly/flew for NWA and they were some of the finest "sticks" I know/knew. I've been on the jump seat of NWA DC-10s and they did not fly them any different than AAL or CAL.
        Tongue in cheek, mostly. Of course I‘m aware that the DC10 isn‘t a new age airplane, that there are checklists to work through, that a 3 man cockpit takes its time.

        regarding north worst: 1,5h delay on departure with opened engines, the seats were done, the food disgusting, the FAs seemed to be on their beam-ends and the DC9 for the connection flight to Grand Forks, ND was coming in on one engine, which took us another 3 hours in MSP and we got exactly the same plane.

        of course it depends on how you define „worst“ it was a great adventure :P
        i7-6700k, GTX 1080TI, 32GB DDR4 RAM @2666MHz, 4k
        Marc Ehnle

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Ephedrin View Post

          Tongue in cheek, mostly. Of course I‘m aware that the DC10 isn‘t a new age airplane, that there are checklists to work through, that a 3 man cockpit takes its time.
          It was my experience that a three man crew worked much smoother and faster. Like the B707, most of the DC-10 F/Es were professional F/Es and they forgot more about airplanes than us pilots would every know. Where the F/E is most valuable is helping to trouble shoot an inflight issue. Three folks in the cockpit are "much more better."

          Bode Bridges
          I Earned my Spurs in Vietnam

          Comment


            #6
            I hope I didn't sound critical, I certainly didn't mean to. IMHO Southwest is the coolest airline going and I'm sure all there pilots are top of the class. I just found it amusing the difference between the manuals instruction for ground handling and realty. It was a hard lean pulling on the runway at KGSP as well exiting the runway in KATL. All for good reason I'm sure. As a former controller I understand fully the need to get on and off a runway quickly for safety and efficiently. Ole $100 burger Joe might have been turning base in his Cherokee. Back in the seventies we were expected to run things tight for efficiency sake but if anything went wrong the controller was faulted for violating the 7110, "The Air Traffic Controllers' Bible" as it was referred to. If controllers went by the book it was considered a concerted job action and the union threatened with fines and suits from the airlines. You felt you worked with a Catch22 sword over your head. I don't know how things are today for ATC. Better I hope.
            Victor Green

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Bluestar View Post

              It was my experience that a three man crew worked much smoother and faster. Like the B707, most of the DC-10 F/Es were professional F/Es and they forgot more about airplanes than us pilots would every know. Where the F/E is most valuable is helping to trouble shoot an inflight issue. Three folks in the cockpit are "much more better."
              Definitely concur with that. The F/E certainly helped expedite checklists and as you say their knowledge was incredible. However in the pre automation era the checklists were rather longer. Not five minutes longer though.

              I flew in NWA DC10s a few times in the early 2000s. The aircraft were very tatty, but crews mostly very professional and the DC10 was always a comfortable plane too fly in. However on one flight the FA working where I was sat was so old she literally used the food trolley as a zimmer frame. Her rollaboard took up all the space in my overhead bin too. I have no problem with older cabin crew, but she would have been a liability in an evacuation. She could barely manage normal cabin duty.

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