Announcement

Collapse

PMDG Forum Rules

1) SIGN YOUR POSTS. Since 1997, we have asked users to sign their real name, first and last, to all posts in the PMDG forum. We do this in order to keep conversations personal and familiar. You took the time to be here, we want to get to know you. This is one of the few rigid rules that we enforce regularly. We do so because we feel that forums in which users must engage one another personally are generally warmer, more collegial and friendly. Posts that are unsigned will be quietly removed without comment by the moderators, so to make your life easy- we recommend enabling your forum signature so that you never need to remember. Do this by clicking the username pull-down at the top right, then selecting "User Settings." You will find the signature editor on the ACCOUNT tab, about half way down the page. Look for "Edit Post Signature." Be sure to click the "Show Signatures" box.

2) BE NICE. We are all simmers here and no matter our differences of opinion, we share a common love of aviation, computing and simulation. Treat everyone else in the forum with respect even when you disagree. If someone frustrates you, walk away from the conversation or ask for a moderator to get involved. Speaking of Moderators, they prefer not to be treated as "The Thought Police" but if any behavior infringes on the enjoyment of another user or is otherwise considered to be unacceptable in the moderator's judgment, it will be addressed in keeping with our view of ensuring that this forum remains a healthy environment for all simmers.

3) BE LAWFUL: Any behavior that infringes upon the law, such as discussion or solicitation of piracy, threats, intimidation or abuse will be handled unsympathetically by the moderators. Threats and intimidation may, at the moderator's discretion, be provided to law enforcement for handling.

4) BE FACTUAL: When you post, always be factual. Moderators will remove posts that are determined not to be factually accurate.

5) RESPECT COPYRIGHTS: Posting of copyrighted material such as flight manuals owned by Boeing or various airlines is not allowed in this forum. If you have questions related to copyrighted material, please contact a forum moderator for clarification.

6) RESPECT PMDG: We love to hear what you like about our products. We also like to hear what you think can be improved, or what isn't working. Please do tell us and we will always treat your feedback with value. Just be sure to treat the team respectfully, as they do put a significant amount of effort into building and maintaining these great simulation products for you.

7) RESPECT PMDG DEVELOPERS: All of the developers will spend some time here. Given the ratio of developers-to-users, it simply isn't possible for us to answer every post and private message individually. Please know that we do try to read everything, but developer workload is simply too high to manage personal contact with tens-of-thousands of users simultaneously. In most cases, members of the development team will stick to conversations in the forum and will not answer private messages.

8) RESPECT OTHER DEVELOPERS: PMDG has always advocated for a strong development community and we have many friends within this community. Every developer offers something unique that helps to make the simming community larger and more vibrant. We insist that you treat our friends respectfully.

9) RESPECT MODERATORS: Moderators have a tough job, and none of them enjoy having to stomp out negativity. If a moderator has to weigh in to keep a thread peaceful, please respect that effort and refrain from giving the moderator any grief.

10) If you require official support for any of our products please open a support ticket through the support portal, https://support.precisionmanuals.com

11) This forum is designed primarily as a vehicle for the PMDG development team to interact with our customers, and for customers to interact with one another in a manner that is positive, supportive and assists in the general advancement of understanding the simulation and helping to make this and future simulations better. Any other use of this forum is not permitted, including but not limited to discussion of pricing policies, business practices, forum moderating policies, advertising of non-PMDG products, promotion of events, services or products that are not approved in advance by PMDG or any other topic deemed unacceptable by any forum administrator

12) HAVE FUN: This is the whole point of it all.
See more
See less

FAA Statement on B737 Max Certification

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    FAA Statement on B737 Max Certification

    The FAA statement on the Max certification.
    Bode Bridges
    I Earned my Spurs in Vietnam

    #2
    Fingers crossed
    i7-6700k, GTX 1080TI, 32GB DDR4 RAM @2666MHz, 4k

    Marc Ehnle

    Comment


      #3
      Theyll be back right in time for the industry to recuperate
      Alex Kulak
      PMDG Studier and flyer

      Comment


        #4
        Gents,

        I spent a few years doing some consulting on industry maters- and I am so glad NOT to be doing that any longer.

        We have never seen impact factors like we are seeing currently- and anyone who tells you that they know how this is going to affect airlines and manufacturers is lying.

        Nobody knows. We are all test pilots now.

        Robert S. Randazzo
        PMDG Simulations
        http://www.pmdg.com


        Comment


        • Bluestar
          Bluestar commented
          Editing a comment
          Then there was the Electra (L-188). I flew from time to time with a Captain and F/E that flew it. The Captain told me that the Electra was the only aircraft he ever flew that he was scared of. Things eventually turned out OK for the Electra, but there were certainly some bumps along the way.

        #5
        Originally posted by rsrandazzo View Post
        Gents,

        I spent a few years doing some consulting on industry maters- and I am so glad NOT to be doing that any longer.

        We have never seen impact factors like we are seeing currently- and anyone who tells you that they know how this is going to affect airlines and manufacturers is lying.

        Nobody knows. We are all test pilots now.
        yeah one big media explosion again, and we are right back where i was loading less than 5 bags on a 737-800. scary times
        Alex Kulak
        PMDG Studier and flyer

        Comment


          #6
          Originally posted by rsrandazzo View Post
          Gents,

          I spent a few years doing some consulting on industry maters- and I am so glad NOT to be doing that any longer.

          We have never seen impact factors like we are seeing currently- and anyone who tells you that they know how this is going to affect airlines and manufacturers is lying.

          Nobody knows. We are all test pilots now.
          Rob,

          I presume by impact factor you mean overall reduction in traffic and load factor?
          Ilari Kousa, Finland

          Comment


            #7
            ...and that said I do hope Boeing lets you release the digital version of the airplane. That flight deck looks like an interesting hybrid.
            Ilari Kousa, Finland

            Comment


              #8
              The big mistake Boeing did, was to rush things out. Instead of having a logical approach to the airlines, providing a safe and efficient aircraft, they worked too quickly to deliver a new model as soon as they could. If one thing is for sure, everything you do in aviation that is rushed out, will not take you far.
              Hopefully now they took their time to investigate, address, and correct the issues. But for the next aircrafts, we can only hope they learned to take their time.
              Giovanni D. Tarar
              FAA CPL+IR Single & Multiengine Land
              I love flying when I'm in a bad mood

              Comment


                #9
                Haha, only reason the 737's compromise anything in the cockpit is because of South West and other airlines that don't want to train a new type or convert simulators. No other reason the new 737 doesn't have a 787 style layout.
                William Holland

                Comment


                  #10
                  Reading the 1st July statement, there's still a long way to go before we see the fleet being "ungrounded", however there is now a clear path to this subject to anything they don't like from the data gathered over the past few days.

                  In terms of the impact on Boeing of this - this goes wider than them! While they were affected by this issue, the knock on effects will hit every aircraft manufacturer the world over as no certifying agency will want a repeat of this. Test programmes will get longer, certification will become tougher to ensure a repeat of this never ever happens again.

                  Boeing have perhaps, and I use this term very very loosely, "been lucky" that a major part of their grounded period has been when the majority of aircraft in the world have also been grounded. In some respects, the timing of the COVID outbreak has actually been a relief for the MAX project (although they won't ACTUALLY be relieved at a worldwide pandemic - but you know where I'm coming from...) as it's hit Airbus, Bombardier etc also.

                  Recovery will come. In the UK, this week saw traffic levels move from 10% of 2019's levels to 25% as some domestic routes re-opened. With England (other UK countries have yet to publish theirs - political spat! ) allowing travel to a number of foreign destinations now with no requirement to quarantine on return, this figure will continue to rise however it will take time. As aviation enthusiasts, these are the weeks we've been waiting for but we should also be prepared for it to be more like the last few months than the last few years...
                  Trevor Hannant

                  Comment


                    #11
                    Originally posted by wjh308 View Post
                    Haha, only reason the 737's compromise anything in the cockpit is because of South West and other airlines that don't want to train a new type or convert simulators. No other reason the new 737 doesn't have a 787 style layout.
                    My thoughts exactly. As much as I thought the 737 was a great example of the 'if it ain't broke, don't fix it' approach, the issues the MAX had showed that you can't just keep bolting on new features and expect them to revolve around a 53 year old design, whilst Airbus have the clear advantage of having a plane that was designed from the ground up to be technologically advanced. If it weren't for their backlog of orders, Airbus would be exploiting the MAX saga by now and the A32xneo would definitely become the king of the narrowbodies.
                    Craig Norman

                    Comment


                      #12
                      The big mistake Boeing did, was to rush things out. Instead of having a logical approach to the airlines, providing a safe and efficient aircraft, they worked too quickly to deliver a new model as soon as they could. If one thing is for sure, everything you do in aviation that is rushed out, will not take you far.
                      Hopefully now they took their time to investigate, address, and correct the issues. But for the next aircrafts, we can only hope they learned to take their time.
                      My understanding is once upon a time the FAA had actual engineers working for them. Now after many rounds of budget cuts they don't. So now when developing a new airframe instead of working with the FAA step by step it all falls on the manufacturer. Very easy for the FAA to sit back and point the finger at Boeing when if they had personnel that could have helped and had input as the airframe was being developed things might not have gotten so far out of sorts in the first place. There is a reason some companies use a "red" team approach to development/planning/ect. Having a non aligned group with fresh eyes will catch mistakes that don't get noticed by "in house" group think.

                      Part of the blame for this mess lies with the FAA and how they operate. But they have nicely slipped away blameless.
                      Charles Harris KRTS The Valley of Speed
                      ASUS ROG Strix B450-F, Ryzen 3700X, 1TB 970 Neo M2,1TB SSD, RX 5700XT 8GB, 32GB DDR4 3200

                      Comment


                      • Mickel
                        Mickel commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Refer your second sentence to see why the FAA operates the way they now must. The 'blame' possibly goes higher.

                        Grand philosophical debate would follow, which has no right answer.
                        Last edited by Mickel; 05Jul2020, 11:02.

                      • Snowfalcon
                        Snowfalcon commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Good point. Cutting budgets always sounds great until the hidden damage is revealed...

                      #13
                      I still can’t believe the 737 max has been grounded for 1 year due to a software issue. Mind boggling. Also mind boggling is how my shares of Bowing was at $420 / share and now I am under $200. Though I bought at $70 long ago.
                      Paul Gugliotta

                      Comment


                        #14
                        Originally posted by Paulyg123 View Post
                        I still can’t believe the 737 max has been grounded for 1 year due to a software issue. Mind boggling. Also mind boggling is how my shares of Bowing was at $420 / share and now I am under $200. Though I bought at $70 long ago.
                        I read that before this episode, Boeing had been buying back it's stock at an enormous scale: $43B over 7 years. This of course increases stock value and makes management (mostly from McDonnel Douglas) very rich. Now that inflated stock price has collapsed and Boeing only has a few months left in it's already extended line of credit. There was a time when profits would be used to grow capital and dividends but these managers are more interested in their own wealth than the health of the company.
                        Dan Downs KCRP

                        Comment


                          #15
                          Originally posted by DDowns View Post

                          I read that before this episode, Boeing had been buying back it's stock at an enormous scale: $43B over 7 years.
                          Yep. Financial engineering played an enormous role in the MAX saga. Re-upping this article from last year - best take so far on the business/financial side of the story: https://newrepublic.com/article/1549...ial-revolution


                          Alan Ampolsk
                          __________________________________________

                          "Ah, Paula, they are firing at me!" -- Saint-Exupery

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X